Disc Golf Terminology


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Disc Golf Terminology

Disc Golf has its own set of terms to describe the various aspects of the discs and their flight characteristics. Below you will find some of the more common terms used by disc-golfers. These terms relate to a right-handed player throwing a regular backhand throw.

Distance driver – the most common disc type, usually small in diameter with a low profile and a sharp edge, these discs are generally the most difficult to control, but also the longest flying. If these discs were golf clubs they would encompass the spectrum from 1-Wood to 5-Wood.
Fairway driver – these discs are slower and do not have the same distance potential as distance drivers. However, fairway drivers are also much easier to control and usually glide better than most distance drivers. Oddly enough, most fairway drivers were at some point in time-distance drivers but technological advancement has bumped them down a notch in the greater scheme of things. If these discs were golf clubs they would encompass the spectrum from 5-Wood to 4-Iron.
Midrange disc – these discs fall somewhere between the fairway drivers and putt & approach discs in terms of distance. They are even slower and more accurate than fairway drivers. Many of these discs were at one-time distance drivers and many of the most versatile discs fall into this type. It is quite likely that the majority of your throws on the course will be performed with midrange discs. If these discs were golf clubs they would encompass the spectrum from 4-Iron to 8-Iron.
Putt & approach disc – these discs are the slowest and shortest flying of the disc types. Often high profile, these discs usually have good glide and are very easy to control and finesse and are generally the most accurate discs available. If these discs were golf clubs they would encompass the spectrum from 8-Iron to Putter.
Stable – a term used to describe the flight of the disc when it flies straight at high speeds when thrown flat.
Hyzer – Releasing the disc with the outer edge at an angle lower than parallel to the ground. This will cause the most discs to curve to the left.
Anhyzer – Releasing the disc with the outer edge at a higher than parallel to the ground. This will cause the most discs to curve to the right.
High Speed Turn – The characteristic of a disc to curve to the right at the beginning of its flight when thrown hard.
Low-Speed Fade – The natural tendency of a disc to tail left as it slows down at the end of its flight.
Predictability – a term that describes the disc’s consistent ability to finish with a left curve at the end of its flight.
Overstable – a general term used to describe the flight of the disc when it has a tendency to pull to the left. A disc that is high speed overstable will begin to curve left immediately out of the hand and require an anhyzer angle to achieve a straight flight. A disc that is low speed overstable will end its flight with a left curve. Nearly all discs are low speed overstable.
Understable – a general term used to describe the flight of a disc when it has a tendency to turn to the right at high speeds. A disc that is high-speed understandable will curve to the right when thrown flat, or flatten and fly straight when thrown with a hyzer angle.
Turnover – The term used to describe the flight of a disc that curves to the right when thrown flat or at hyzer. A less overstable or understandable disc will generally be easier to turn over.
Nose Down – Releasing the disc with the front end of the disc lower than the back end. Certain discs will fly better when thrown nose down.
Nose Up – Releasing the disc with the front end of the disc higher than the back end.
Stall Out – A term used to describe the flight of a disc when it peaks in height and drops off to the left without much glide. This generally occurs when the disc is thrown with the nose up.
S-Curve – A term used to describe the flight of a disc when it begins by turning to the right and then “flexes” out and glides back to the left.
Roller – A type of throw where the disc is turned over so far that it lands on its edge and rolls.
Snap – A term used to describe the arm speed and power a player gets into their throw. More snap will generally make the disc fly faster and further.

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