Should You Use A Driver, Midrange or Putter?

When you are on the disc golf course, you want to be able to choose between a few different discs. Many people, when they first start playing this exciting and fun sport, merely grab one disc and give it their best shot. When you play regularly, though, you realize that having three discs with you on the course is the only way to truly perform well.

The Basics of the Three Discs

There are three basic disc types in this game. The Driver, the Midrange, and the Putter discs. Each one has its own benefits, as well as its challenges. There are also dozens of different options within each category type to suit any level of a disc golfer.

The Driver

With the driver disc, you get a lightweight disc that can travel much farther than the other two discs. Some of the holes that you will face on these disc golf courses will exceed four hundred feet. While each disc will go as far as the particular player’s skill set will allow, the driver can range from just over two hundred feet to somewhat longer than three hundred. The driver is more susceptible to movement and can turn sharply and be affected by subtle nuances in the wind, the throw, or the conditions. Its accuracy improves only with the ability of the player.

The Midrange

The midrange disc has more stability, weighs slightly more than the driver, and will travel generally less than two hundred feet. The midrange is more suited for shorter holes or for second (or approach) shots to the hole.

The Putter

The putter disc is the most balanced, and heaviest of the three, but will also be more accurate. The putter is designed to be thrown within a comfortable range of the hole. For the average disc golfer, this would be within seventy-five feet of the hole.

Sometimes a disc golfer will choose a midrange disc for a fifty-foot throw, depending on what obstacles are in his or her way. Other times, he or she may choose the putter for a longer shot.

These are just the basic guidelines to explain the differences between the discs. How you use them is entirely up to you. The more comfortable you become with certain discs, the apter you are to use them in certain situations. It’s akin to the regular golfer who decides to leave his driver at home because he hits his irons better and just as far. With disc golf, though, as with any sport, the more you practice and play, the better you become.

Categories: Disc Golf

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